Carin Covin

Trees, 1989, Carin Covin, drawing, 45.5 x 37 cm, 1995.06.01

Trees, 1989, Carin Covin, drawing, 45.5 x 37 cm, 1995.06.01

Carin Covin

Carin Covin received her BFA from Okanagan University College in 2003, and her MFA from UBC Okanagan in 2010. 

As a drawer and a painter, her current research interests are in the intersection of creative writing and visual language.  She is interested in the diary form and the lyric essay and how these writing genres interweave into a contemporary painting and drawing practice.

"I am a drawer and a painter.  My current research interests are in the intersection of creative writing and visual language.  I am interested in the diary form and the lyric essay and how these writing genres interweave into a contemporary painting and drawing practice. 

The genre of the lyric essay has a unique ability to intersect with drawing and painting for it has the ability to access the inner territories of memory, nostalgia and identity.  The lyric essay is a form which combines poetry and prose and allows for meaning to be blocked in through suggestion, gives form to silence, articulates absence, and has the ability to compose through fragments.  I am interested in these themes for their capacity to map the geographies of the changing landscape of identity and family. 

            We receive many of our concepts of identity and family through the societal texts of our education and culture.  The Poststructuralist theorists Jacque Derrida and Roland Barthes have written extensively regarding the deconstruction of our societal texts.  Their investigations are centered on the pluralistic nature of meaning that can be found within spoken language and written text.  Derrida, through his writings, suggests that there is no unification of meaning, and many of his ideas identify the social structures that give dominance to some texts and ideas over others.  Barthes examines text through a semiotic reading that allows for the freedom of meaning to differ from one individual to the next.  He suggests that the personal lens of an individual, formed through a unique set of experiences, defines how the individual sees and interprets the world around them.

            My studio practice is based in the arena of observation and response; a place that, when combined with the diary form, involves observation of both our public and our private spheres.  I suggest that these concepts reflect our social and our psychological space, and my works investigate this fluid location of making."

Source: The Artist